UV Index Mount Maunganui, provided by
Skinspots Skin Cancer Clinic 

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Current UV Index Reading


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Refer to the notes below on the UV Index risks and recommendations

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  • UV Index Zero - there is no danger.
  • UV Index 1 and 2 - Low protection is needed for the average person who can safely stay outside during these levels. Wear sunglasses on bright days. If you burn easily, cover up and use a broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen. Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure. 
  • UV Index 3 to 5 - This is a moderate UV levels with a risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Protection is required when spending longer periods outside. Stay in the shade near midday when the sun is strongest. If outdoors, wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses. Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating. Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure. 
  • UV Index 6 and 7 - Kiwis will be advised to follow the Cancer Society's slip, slop, slap and wrap behaviours. A UV Index reading of 6 to 7 means high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Protection against skin and eye damage is needed. Reduce time in the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses. Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating. Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure. 
  • UV Index 8 to 10 - These levels are in the high range! It's recommended people seek shade between 11am and 4pm, slip, slop, slap and wrap and make sure they reapply sunscreen at least every two hours. Readings of 8 to 10 means very high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Take extra precautions because unprotected skin and eyes will be damaged and can burn quickly. Minimize sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses. Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating. Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure. 
  • UV Index 11 or Higher - Levels of 11 or higher are regarded as a extreme risk from unprotected sun exposure. Reschedule outdoor activities for early morning and evening. Full protection is essential between 11am and 4pm. Take all precautions because unprotected skin and eyes can burn in minutes. Try to avoid sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses. Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating. Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure. 
We experience the sun’s visible light all that we see, and the sun’s warmth (infrared radiation) which we feel. UV cannot be seen or felt until after damage has occurred to the skin. There is a huge variation in UV levels each day. The UV level is affected by a number of factors including the time of day, time of year, cloud cover, altitude, proximity to the equator, scattering and reflection. The time you can spend in the sun at different UV levels also depends on your skin colour. The darker your skin the longer you can stay in the sun. 

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